February 2019 wrap-up

Hi beauties! So I am back with my second wrap up. February was a pretty disappointing reading month for me. I only read 4 books. Life and school has been crazy this month so that is why. I’m hoping March will be a better month.

Here’s what I read:

Overall, I enjoyed most of what I read this month. I didn’t have any 5 star reads, but was still happy. The Gilded Wolves was probably my favorite of this month because omg the representation!

How was your reading month? Let me know in the comments!

Connect with me!

Goodreads | Instagram | Twitter | Facebook

Review: the mermaid’s voice returns in this one (women are some kind of magic #3)

Click the picture to purchase the book on Amazon

Rating: ★★★½

I received an e-ARC of this book for free from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.  

This book is really similar to the other two books in this series. So if you liked those, then you’ll probably like this one. That being said, I still think her first book is the strongest. 

The subject matter of the book is very timely. A large majority of the poems center on the Me Too movement. 

The theme of this book is mermaids/The Little Mermaid story. However, there wasn’t a lot of actual mermaid inspired poems. She seemed to revert back to princesses/queens and fairy tales in general. Given the focus on Me Too/sexual assault, there could have been a lot done with The Little Mermaid theme. To me it felt like a missed opportunity. 

This collection also contains some guest poems from other poets and I loved that addition. It added some variety and it worked well with the Me Too message because it showed strength in numbers. 

I did enjoy a lot of the poems. There were some that really spoke to me. I did love that one of her poems was an homage to The Chronicles of Narnia, which is one of my favorite book series of all time.  

Overall, this collection is perfect for fans of Amanda Lovelace. If you’re looking for something different from her, you may want to skip this one. 

Review: Current Feels

40018777

Click the picture to buy the book on Amazon

Rating: ★★★★★

I received this book for free from the author in exchange for an honest review.

I really loved this poetry collection!

The poems are written in an Instagram poet style very similar to Rupi Kaur and Amanda Lovelace, which some people really love and some people really hate. If you’re not a fan of that style, then maybe this book isn’t for you. Personally, I really enjoy that style, so I had no issue with it.

To me this collection felt like a mixture of Rupi Kaur and Amanda Lovelace, with a splash of Lang Leav and Michael Faudet. But Portia’s own voice and unique point of view rang loudly throughout all the poems. They didn’t feel like a copycat of anyone else’s poems; they felt uniquely hers. 

IMG_0821

My favorite poems were in the Summer and Spring sections of the book. I really liked the romantic poems in Summer because I am a sucker for those. I love reading poems about falling in love. The poems about her African background and heritage in the Spring portion were standouts that really shined. It’s so important that experiences and voices like hers are heard. 

Overall, I was very impressed with this collection and I look forward to seeing what else Portia publishes in the future!

Review: the witch doesn’t burn in this one (women are some kind of magic #2)

39006052

Click the picture to buy the Target exclusive edition

Rating: ★★★★

This is a review of the Target special edition. It has a red cover instead of the white one, a letter from the author, and bonus poems.

I was so excited to read this because I’ve been super into witches lately. However, I liked this, but I didn’t like it as much as her first collection.

IMG_0097

This collection got a bit repetitive at some points. There were a lot of poems on burning and fire. I wish there would have been more poems about the coven aspect of witches. There was a lot she could have done with covens, especially in the last section. It thought it was a missed opportunity.

Another thing that I didn’t love was how she brought up queens in this book. In the last section she talks about witch-queens, and I wished she would have just focused solely on witches. References to queens should have stayed in her first collection.

As for the bonus poems that are included in this edition, I really loved the first one about girl on girl hate. I wished that would have made the final cut.

Despite all of that, I still enjoyed this collection. There were some really good poems. But overall, it didn’t quite meet my expectations.


Follow my blog with Bloglovin

SaveSaveSaveSave

SaveSave